Lewis Jones

Lewis Jones


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Lewis Jones was born in Clydach Vale in 1897. He started work underground at the age of 12 in the Cambrian Combine Colliery. Jones became active in the National Union of Mineworkers (NUM) and in 1910-11 took part in the strike that culminated in the Tonypandy Riots.

After attending the Central Labour College in London (1923-25) Jones joined the Communist Party of Great Britain (CPGB).

During the 1926 General Strike he was imprisoned for three months in Swansea jail for his trade union activities in the Nottinghamshire coalfield. Will Paynter later wrote:"The miners' lock-out dragged on through the months of 1926 and really was petering-out when the decision came to end it. We had fought on alone but in the end we had to accept defeat spelt out in further wage-cuts." By October 1926 hardship forced men to begin to drift back to the mines.

Lewis Jones, like many union activists was blacklisted and found it difficult to find work. He eventually checkweighman of the Cambrian Lodge of the South Wales Miners' Federation. In 1929, he resigned, refusing to work with non-unionised labour.

Jones eventually became the Welsh organiser of the National Unemployed Workers' Movement. He toured the country making speeches and Douglas Hyde was one of those who was converted to communism after hearing him speak in Bristol. Hywel Francis argues that Jones "was even capable of holding an audience of over a thousand people for two and a half with his lecture" on the "Social Significance of Sin".

Billy Griffiths, a fellow member of the Communist Party of Great Britain, later claimed: "His main quality I think was love of people and compassion, it superseded everything else. I have seen Lewis... sitting down listening to two old people telling him about their troubles, and tears running down his cheeks. That's the kind of man he was, he felt it, it was for him more than logic... You see it was more important than the politics, [it] was the humanism and compassion... it was this that people loved about him."

In 1935 Jones was sent by the CPGB to attend the Seventh World Congress of the Communist International in Moscow. Jones rejected the "cult of personality" and refused to join in the standing ovation when Joseph Stalin entered the hall. Jones was sent home in disgrace and was later disciplined by the CPGB.

Jones led several hunger marches to London. Jones led the anti fascist demonstration against Oswald Mosley and fellow members of the British Union of Fascist speaking at Pontypool town hall in April 1936. Later that year he was elected along with another Communist councillor for Rhondda on Glamorgan County Council.

On 8th November 1936, Lewis Jones was involved in organising a protest march from Wales to London against unemployment. Will Paynter later wrote about the demonstration in his book, My Generation (1972): "The march converged on Hyde Park on Sunday, 8 November and again the composition of the Welsh platform testified to the unity that had been achieved. The Speakers were Nye Bevan, Jim Griffiths and Bill Mainwaring for the Labour Party and Arthur Horner and Lewis Jones for the Communist Party. On the following day, a petition with a million signatures was presented to Parliament; the marchers' leaders addressed an all-party meeting there and won considerable support for the proposal that marchers' representatives should be allowed to put their case from the floor of the House."

During the Spanish Civil War Jones was one of the most important figures in recruiting people to fight for the British Battalion. Jones was considered for the role as political commissar to look after the British Battalion's interests at the International Brigade headquarters at Albacete. As Hywel Francis pointed out in Miners Against Fascism (1974): "In the District Committee discussion, a number of candidates were considered although no great enthusiasm appears to have been shown by any of them except Lewis Jones, but he was physically unfit and was indispensable as a propagandist."

It was later reported that there were "170 volunteers from Wales, and 116 of them came from the mining industry, around 25 per cent of them union officials at pit level... The average age was over thirty and 18 per cent of the Welsh volunteers were married." The South Wales miners provided the largest regional occupational group in the British Battalion.

Arthur Horner, the President of the South Wales Miners' Federation and fellow member of the Communist Party of Great Britain, suggested that Jones wrote about his experiences in the form of a novel. Cwmardy was published in 1937. It is claimed by Hywel Francis that the main character in the novel is based on Will Paynter.

Jones' close friend, Harry Dobson, was killed on 28th July 1938. During the battle of Ebro the Nationalist Army had 6,500 killed and nearly 30,000 wounded. These were the worst casualties of the war and it finally destroyed the Republican Army as a fighting force.

Lewis continued to campaign for funds but he refused to continue to recruit men to fight in the British Battalion. He told his friend Billy Griffiths that he no longer had the right to "get the young boys to go there and die."

In 1938 the Communist Party of Great Britain joined forces with the Independent Labour Party to campaign on a broad programme of action against "fascism, reaction and war". Paynter toured the country making speeches with political figures such as Harry Pollitt, Will Paynter, Stafford Cripps, Lewis Jones, James Maxton, D. N. Pritt, Arthur Horner, John Strachey and Aneurin Bevan. As Paynter pointed out: "It was a period of political revival created by this movement of left-wing unity."

On 27th January 1939 he addressed 30 meetings supporting the fight against fascism in Spain. That night he died of a heart-attack. Some of his friends later claimed that he died of a broken-heart because he knew that the International Brigades were heading for defeat.

Lewis Jones' second novel, We Live, was unfinished. It is believed that his partner, Mavis Llewellyn, wrote the last two chapters, "A Party Decision" and "A Letter from Spain". The book was published later that year.

His main quality I think was love of people and compassion, it superseded everything else. That's the kind of man he was, he felt it, it was for him more than logic. The rules that could do nothing for these people had to be broken, understand? .... I remember recruiting people, we had a meeting here for some people to go to Spain. We used to have a long table here and Lewis sat in by there, by the fire, and I was trying to interest people to go to Spain.... And when they had gone out, Lewis got up in the end, he couldn't stand it any more, he said: `You've no right, to do that, to get the young boys to go there and die...' You see it was more important than the politics, [it] was the humanism and compassion... it was this that people loved about him.

The South Wales District of the CPGB was asked in March to choose a suitable member of their Committee with a thorough trade union background as a political commissar to look after the British Battalion's interests at the International Brigades' headquarters at Albacete and also to handle personal and other related problems." It appears however that the major task was to sort out the problems existing in the Battalion leadership and to make recommendations for the reorganisation of the Battalion. The CPGB in particular was disturbed by reports of disobedience and desertion among the British volunteers, some of whom were captured and imprisoned at the Albacete base."

In the District Committee discussion, a number of candidates were considered although no great enthusiasm appears to have been shown by any of them except Lewis Jones, but he was physically unfit and was indispensable as a propagandist... Len Jefferies was almost chosen, but in common with Phil Abrahams (imprisoned in 1935), it was probably considered unfair to ask for a further personal sacrifice when he had only been released from jail in June 1935 after three years of penal servitude. It was ultimately considered that Will Paynter had the "necessary qualifications". He was a former Cymmer Colliery checkweighman, political prisoner in 1931, three times a Hunger Marcher, trained in Moscow's Lenin School and elected the first unemployed miner to the SWMF rank-and-file executive in 1936, he appeared to be the obvious choice. He did however accept "without any great enthusiasm", as he had only recently married. His wife was nevertheless a deeply committed Communist, and had been involved in the anti-fascist disturbance in Tonypandy in June 1936. He stayed for some time in London where he was more thoroughly briefed on his tasks in the Battalion." He arrived at the front with Ted Bramley of the London District of the CPGB early in May.

The march converged on Hyde Park on Sunday, 8 November and again the composition of the Welsh platform testified to the unity that had been achieved. On the following day, a petition with a million signatures was presented to Parliament; the marchers' leaders addressed an all-party meeting there and won considerable support for the proposal that marchers' representatives should be allowed to put their case from the floor of the House. On 11 November, the petition we had delivered came before Parliament, with Attlee, then leader of the Parliamentary Labour Party, moving the adjournment to consider "a definite matter of urgent public importance". The motion was defeated, but not before a number of Welsh miners' members had pressed the case of the unemployed and forced a reply from Prime Minister Baldwin. A week earlier the marchers from Jarrow, led by Ellen Wilkinson, MP, had presented their plea to the government which had accepted it entirely differently from the way in which it received thee national march. The South Wales marchers, it was said; represented a

"political agitation designed to discredit and overthrow the government'. Their own policies were discrediting them but the likelihood of their overthrow, however desirable, seemed remote even to those of us who wanted it.

He was a maverick in the best sense of the word. Born illegitimate, he was shaped by riotous and cosmopolitan Tonypandy. He married young, enjoyed the company of men and women, could never be a party 'apparatchik' and would never jump through other people's hoops. His was a discordant revolutionary voice like that of Federico Garcia Lorca, Aneurin Bevan and Antonio Gramsci...

His powerfully evocative speeches painted such vivid pictures of his people's individual and collective struggles it was thought that he would make a natural novelist. That was the view of Arthur Horner, the President of the South Wales Miners' Federation. Lewis acknowledged this in his foreword to Cwmardy, referring to Horner as "my friend and comrade... whose fertile brain conceived the idea that I should write it". According to Lewis, Arthur Horner "suggested that the full meaning of life in the Welsh mining areas could be expressed for the general reader more truthfully and vividly if treated imaginatively".

And that, expressed in Lewis' own words, is the essence of both the work and the man for us today. He was the "people's remembrancer" who had also contributed actively to the people's chronicle. In that sense Lewis Jones is unique in the political culture of Wales in the twentieth century, standing alongside only Saunders Lewis (and what an intriguing contrast) in combining political activism with literary aspirations and, indeed, with literary achievement. The difference between the two, however, was that Lewis Jones was directly of the Welsh working class and gave voice to their pain and suffering. For that reason he stands apart from all other activists and writers in that remarkable generation of self-educated working class men and women, the organic intellectuals who provided local and national leadership for communities broken by economic depression. He was the organic intellectual of the South Wales valleys in the inter-war period.


“There Is Power in the Blood”

INTRO.: A song which emphasizes the fact that we are redeemed by the blood of Christ is “There Is Power In The Blood” (#276 in Hymns for Worship Revised, #198 in Sacred Selections for the Church). The text was written and the tune (Power In The Blood) was composed both by Lewis Edgar Jones, who was born at Yates City, IL, on Feb. 8, 1865. Graduating from Moody Bible Institute in the same class with well-known revival evangelist Billy Sunday, Jones became active in YMCA work which he did for the rest of his life, serving first as physical director in the YMCA at Davenport, IA, and then as general secretary in Ft. Worth, TX.

Jones’s most famous song, “There Is Power in the Blood,” was produced while Jones was attending a camp meeting at Mountain Lake Park, MD. The manuscript was purchased by Henry Lake Gilmour (1836-1920). It was first printed in Songs of Praise and Victory, compiled at Philadelphia, PA, in 1899 for the Pepper Publishing Co. by Gilmour and William James Kirkpatrick (1838-1921). It also appeared later that same year in another Kirkpatrick book, Gospel Praises. Gilmour was the author of “The Haven of Rest.” Kirkpatrick provided tunes for several well-known gospel songs, including “He Hideth My Soul” with words by Fanny Crosby.

In 1915, Jones became YMCA general secretary in Santa Barbara, CA, where he remained until his retirement in 1925. Hymn writing was his hobby, and in his spare time he produced quite a few songs that were published. Another one that has appeared in many of our books is “We Shall See The King Someday.” Cyberhymnal lists four more, but Hymnary.org lists 201. According to his daughter, Mrs. Virgil Wayman of Santa Barbara, he used various pseudonyms such as Lewis Edgar, Edgar Lewis, Mary Slater, and others. In 1927, the copyright on “There Is Power in the Blood” was renewed by Hope Publishing Company. Jones’s death occurred at Santa Barbara, CA, on Sept. 1, 1936.

Among hymnbooks published by members of the Lord’s church for use in churches of Christ, “There Is Power in the Blood” has appeared in the 1921 Great Songs of the Church (No. 1) and the 1948 Great Songs of the Church No. 2 both edited by E. L. Jorgenson the 1935 Christian Hymns (No. 1), the 1948 Christian Hymns No. 2, and the 1966 Christian Hymns No. 3 all edited by L. O. Sanderson the 1959 Majestic Hymnal No. 2 and the 1978 Hymns of Praise both edited by Reuel Lemmons the 1963 Abiding Hymns edited by Robert C. Welch the 1963 Christian Hymnal edited by J. Nelson Slater the 1965 Great Christian Hymnal No. 2 edited by Tillit S. Teddlie the 1971 Songs of the Church, the 1990 Songs of the Church 21 st C. Ed., and the 1994 Songs of Faith and Praise all edited by Alton H. Howard the 1978/1983 Church Gospel Songs and Hymns edited by V. E. Howard the 1986 Great Songs Revised edited by Forrest M. McCann the 1992 Praise for the Lord edited by John P. Wiegand the 2007 Sacred Songs of the Church edited by William D. Jeffcoat the 2009 Favorite Songs of the Church and the 2010 Songs for Worship and Praise both edited by Robert J. Taylor Jr. and the 2012 Psalms, Hymns, and Spiritual Songs edited by Steve Wolfgang et. al. in addition to Hymns for Worship and Sacred Selections.

The hymn points out a number of benefits that are available in the blood of Jesus.

I. In stanza 1, we are told that the blood can make us free from the burden of sin.

Would you be free from your burden of sin?

There’s power in the blood, power in the blood

Would you o’er evil a victory win?

There’s wonderful power in the blood.

A. At one time or another, all responsible people have to deal with the burden of sin: Rom. 3:23

B. However, God has made it possible for us to gain a victory over it: 1 Cor. 15:57

C. The basis for this victory is that Jesus Christ has washed us from our sins in His blood: Rev. 1:5

II. In stanza 2, we are told that the blood can cleanse us from our passion and pride.

Would you be free from your passion and pride?

There’s power in the blood, power in the blood

Come for a cleansing to Calvary’s tide

There’s wonderful power in the blood.

A. Even as Christians, we still have to deal with the problem of passion and pride: Col. 3:5

B. But God has a remedy to help us be free from these things, and it is what Christ has done for us at Calvary: Lk. 23:33

C. As a result, Christians can be cleansed by Jesus’s blood when we confess our sins to Him: 1 Jn. 1:7-9

III. In stanza 3, we are told that the blood will make us whiter than snow.

Would you be whiter, much whiter than snow?

There’s power in the blood, power in the blood

Sin stains are lost in its life giving flow.

There’s wonderful power in the blood.

A. Sin is pictured as a scarlet stain that blots the soul: Isa. 1:18

B. Therefore, we need to have them washed whiter than snow: Ps. 51:7

C. Since the blood of Christ is the basis for our pardon, our robes are made white by it: Rev. 7:13-14

IV. In stanza 4, we are told that the blood enables us to serve our King and live for Him

Would you do service for Jesus your King?

There’s power in the blood, power in the blood

Would you live daily His praises to sing?

There’s wonderful power in the blood.

A. The Bible teaches that we should serve the Lord Christ: Col. 3:24

B. The reason that we should serve Him is because He is our King: Rev. 19:16

C. Because we have redemption through Christ’s blood, we can serve Him as part of His kingdom: Col. 1:13-14

CONCL.: The chorus, by simple repetition, focuses our minds on the ability of the blood of Christ to do these things:

There is power, power, wonder working power

There is power, power, wonder working power

In the precious blood of the Lamb.

One of the most important things for people who are lost in sin and even for Christians when we sin is to know that “There Is Power in the Blood.”


Our History

Newby, Lewis, Kaminski & Jones, LLP (“NLKJ”) traces its origins to the law firm of Doran and Conboy which was formed in 1907.

Frank J. Conboy was a 1904 graduate of Notre Dame University and its law school. After graduation from law school, he settled in La Porte and became a partner with Philo Q. Doran who was a graduate of Elston High School in Michigan City and was admitted to the Bar of the State of Indiana in 1895. After Mr. Doran’s death in 1934, William Pusch became Mr. Conboy’s partner and the law firm of Conboy & Pusch was formed. After Mr. Pusch’s unexpected death at the age 46, John E. Newby joined Mr. Conboy and the practice of law in 1952 under the name of “Conboy & Newby” until Mr. Conboy’s death in 1955.

John E. Newby was a graduate of the University of Chicago Law School and had served in the Federal Bureau of Investigation prior to entering private practice. He developed a practice in corporate and real estate transactions and represented numerous small and large corporations. As Mr. Newby’s practice grew, he asked Daniel E. Lewis, Sr. to join his practice. Mr. Lewis had a career background as a teacher and later oversaw human resources for a large local company prior to entering into private practice. His unique background allowed him to develop a practice involving schools and representing employers on labor matters. In 1958, La Porte native Leon R. Kaminski joined Newby & Lewis as a partner and the firm became known as Newby, Lewis & Kaminski. Leon R. Kaminski developed a reputation as a premier litigator in both civil and criminal cases. He became active in the Bar and eventually became President of the Indiana State Bar, the only attorney to date from La Porte County to be so honored. His litigation skills led him to induction into the exclusive American College of Trial Lawyers.

As the law practice quickly expanded for Newby, Lewis & Kaminski, and in 1966 Hoosier native Gene M. Jones joined the firm after serving in the Judge Advocate General’s Office of the United States Air Force. He was named a partner in the law firm in 1973. Mr. Jones also developed a reputation as a premier litigator and had jury verdicts and settlements leading to some of the largest plaintiff cases in La Porte County while he was in practice. His trial skills were recognized by his peers and he was also named to the American College of Trial Lawyers.

Over the last four (4) decades, NLKJ’s scope of practice has grown tremendously to become La Porte County’s largest law firm. Its lawyers assist clients who have sustained serious injuries from accidents, slip and falls or product defects. NLKJ’s trial lawyers handle cases at all trial levels, both federal and state courts, including employment related claims based on discrimination for age, sex, disability and wrongful termination.

NLKJ’s lawyers assist numerous corporations and businesses from “start-ups” to multi-million dollar revenue generating corporations, to private foundations and not-for-profit entities. It offers complex labor and employment regulation assistance to its clients.

NLKJ also handles all legal matters an individual may confront during their life including adoptions, divorce, criminal defense, elder law (including estate and Medicaid planning) and real estate issues (including zoning).

Today, NLKJ’s experienced lawyers have received recognition from clients and peer attorneys. NLKJ’s lawyers have been recognized by members of the American College of Trial Lawyers, American College of Probate Counsel, “Super Lawyers,” Best Firms in America and numerous attorneys are “A” rated by the prestigious Martindale Hubbell rating firm.


Opened Her Boutique in 2015

From early on in her life, Penrhyn wanted to have her own clothing shop. Therefore, after a long career doing hair and make-up in drama and films, she finally gathered up the courage to open up her own clothing business.

Talking to Toolally in September 2018, she stated that she was 47-year-old then. She further disclosed that she was 40 when she started making plans about it.

But it was in 2015 when the Y Coleg Normal alum actually found the inspiration and support to start her own clothing store. She was spending time with Jones in London at the time.

While in London, she fell in love with shopping, especially in the exclusive boutiques of Notting Hill and Primrose Park. These places gave her an entry into a new world of fashion brands. She wanted to bring those brands to her native Cardiff, where they weren&rsquot available at the time.

The 50 best boutiques in Britain as chosen by Telegraph readers, fashion editors and our favourite influence
So proud of my darling wife @Kiti_Cymru @Telegraph
Mor browd. Llongyfarchiadau. xxx &mdash Mark Lewis Jones (@marklewisjones) February 17, 2019

She went back home and opened a boutique store in Pontcanna, Cardiff, and named it after her late grandmother, Kiti, whom she adored. Thus, Kiti Cymru was born.


Increasingly Radical

By the mid-1880s, Mary Jones had left the Knights of Labor, finding them too conservative. She became involved in more radical organizing by 1890.

A fiery orator, she spoke at the location of strikes around the country. She helped coordinate hundreds of strikes, including those with coal miners in Pennsylvania in 1873 and railroad workers in 1877.

She was named often in newspapers as "Mother Jones," a white-haired radical labor organizer in her signature black dress, lace collar, and plain head covering. "Mother Jones" was a loving moniker given her by workers, grateful for her care of and devotion to working people.


Jones Family History

1. John William JONES was born and married in England. His son was William JONES (born on 31 Oct 1735).

2. William JONES was born on 31 Oct 1735 in Alderbury, Shropshire, England. He died on 1 Sep 1823 in Plains, Laurens, SC. He was buried in the Jones Graveyard, Greenville, SC. William JONES and Mary WHITLOCK were married in 1760 in VA. Mary WHITLOCK (daughter of James WHITLOCK III. and Agnes CHRISTMAS) was born on 15 Apr 1741 in VA. She died in 1825 in Plains, SC(?). William JONES and Mary WHITLOCK had the following children:

(1) Thomas JONES was born in 1761.
(2) Richard JONES (born on 4 Dec 1763).
(3) Moses JONES was born in 1764.
(4) Elizabeth JONES was born in 1767.
(5) Richard JONES was born on 4 Dec 1768.
(6) Milley JONES (born on 9 May 1772).
(7) Soloman JONES (born on 28 Oct 1774).
(8) John J. JONES (born on 28 Jul 1777).
(9) Mary ‘Polly’ JONES (born on 12 Oct 1783).
(10) Abner JONES (born on 19 Aug 1786).

9. Soloman JONES was born on 28 Oct 1774 in Plains, Greenville Co., SC or VA. He died on 24 Apr 1843. Soloman JONES married Elizabeth GRIFFITH. They had the following children:

(1) Hiram JONES.
(2) Mary JONES.
(3) Emilia JONES.
(4) Francis JONES.
(5) William JONES.
(6) Rebecca JONES.
(7) Milly JONES.
(8) Allen JONES.
(9) Mahalia JONES.
(10) Sterling JONES.
(11) Benjamin JONES.
(12) Griffith JONES (born on 5 Jan 1804).

Hiram JONES was born about 1802 in Greenville county, South Carolina and died about 1870 in Hall county, Georgia. He married Lydia. Hiram JONES and Lydia had the following children:

(1) John Lewis Jones jr. was born 25 March 1825.
(2) Rebecca Jones.
(3) Issac A. Jones.
(4) J.A. Jones.
(5) K. Jones.
(6) Soloman Jones.
(7) Nancy Jones.
(8) Jacob Jones.

John Lewis Jones jr. was born 25 March 1825 Greenville county, South Carolina and died 11 October 1900 in Forsyth county, Georgia. He is buried in Salem Baptist Church Cemetery, Forsyth County, Georgia. He married Nancy Cross ABT 1846, daughter of Nimrod Cross and Elizabeth. She was born 1826 in South Carolina, and died ABT 1859. He married Didamia “Damy” Cross 11 OCT 1860 in Forsyth County, Georgia, daughter of Nimrod Cross and Elizabeth. She was born ABT 1831 in Hall County, Georgia, and died 17 DEC 1900 in Forsyth County, Georgia. She was buried in Salem Baptist Church Cemetery, Forsyth County, Georgia.

John L. Jones Jr. and Nancy Cross had the following children:

(1) Mary Adeline Jones was born 26 MAY 1847 in Forsyth County, Georgia, and died 20 JUN 1905 in Forsyth County, Georgia.
(2) Lydia Elizabeth Jones was born 02 JAN 1849 in Forsyth County, Georgia, and died 06 MAY 1892 in Forsyth County, Georgia.
(3) Martha Emily Jones was born 04 OCT 1851 in Forsyth County, GA, and died 04 JAN 1924 in Hall County, Georgia.
(4) William Anderson Jones was born NOV 1855 in Forsyth County, Georgia, and died 25 MAY 1907 in Forsyth County, Georgia.
(5) James Allison Jones was born 27 MAR 1856 in Forsyth County, Georgia, and died 22 OCT 1935 in Forsyth County, Georgia.
(6) Hiram Nimrod Jones was born 1859, and died 12 OCT 1930 in Alabama.

Children of John L. Jones Jr. and Didamia “Damy” Cross are:

(7) Leonard Albert Jones was born 07 APR 1861 in Forsyth County, Georgia, and died 18 JUN 1930 in Forsyth County, Georgia.
(8) Nancy E. Jones was born 07 NOV 1862 in Forsyth County, Georgia, and died 06 MAY 1892 in Forsyth County, Georgia.
(9) Demeris Jones was born BET 1864 AND 1865, and died in Texas.
(10) Missouri A. Jones was born 02 AUG 1867 in Forsyth County, Georgia, and died 08 MAR 1947 in Forsyth County, Georgia.
(11) Sarah L. “Lou” Jones was born 1872, and died in Texas.

Leonard Albert Jones was born 07 APR 1861 in Forsyth County, Georgia, and died 18 JUN 1930 in Forsyth County, Georgia. He is buried in Concord Baptist Church Cemetery, Forsyth County, Georgia. He married Mary Mollie L. Crow 13 NOV 1880 in Forsyth County, Georgia. She was born FEB 1861 in Forsyth County, Georgia, and died 02 JAN 1914 in Forsyth County, Georgia. She was buried in Concord Baptist Church Cemetery, Forsyth County, Georgia. He married Altie Clark 13 JAN 1915 in Forsyth County, Georgia, daughter of Minor Clinton Clark and Nancy Emaline Hope. She was born 14 MAY 1882 in Forsyth County, Georgia, and died 27 JUL 1969 in Forsyth County, Georgia. She was buried in Sawnee View Memorial Gardens, Forsyth County, Georgia.

Child of Leonard Albert Jones and Mary Mollie L. Crow is:

(1) William Alonzo Nathaniel Jones was born 11 APR 1884 in Forsyth County, Georgia.

Children of Leonard Albert Jones and Altie Clark are:

(2) Unknown
(3) Emma Lucille Jones was born 1922 in Forsyth County, GA, and died 07 OCT 2009 in Forsyth County, GA.

William Alonzo Nathaniel Jones was born 11 APR 1884 in Forsyth County, Georgia. He married (1)Sarah Lou Bennett 02 OCT 1902 in Forsyth County, Georgia, daughter of Leonidas Jordan Bennett and Rozzie Dell Patterson. She was born 01 JAN 1887 in Forsyth County, Georgia, and died 01 JUN 1903 in In First Gainesville Tornado (Cyclone). She was buried in New Hope Methodist Church, Forsyth County, GA. He married (2) Effie Louella Whitmire 1904 in Georgia. Effie Louella Whitmire was born 15 September 1881 in Dawson, Georgia to Henry Alonzo Whitmire and Dorcas Amanda Cheek She died 13 December 1964 after a long illness at her home in Atlanta, Georgia and is burried in the Decatur Cemetary. He married (3) Laura Charlotte Bennett 16 July 1936 in Seville, Ga.

William Alonzo Nathaniel Jones raised his family in Silver City, Forsyth County, Georgia. Their large white farm house surrounded by a porch on three sides is still standing off Hwy. 9.

William graduated from the Atlanta School of Medicine (Emory University) in 1908. Family tradition says that he served as a doctor in Chattanooga, Tn. During WWI. After the war the family moved to south Georgia to Hatley, Seville and Pitts, Ga. William was a doctor there and sometimes took payment in chickens and other farm goods. Family tradition says that he was one of the best medical Diagnostics in the South East and was often called to Atlanta to help with difficult patients.

At some point about 1924 the family moved back to Atlanta. When William told his wife Effie that he was going to move back to south Georgia, she refused and they divorced. William then met and married Laura Charlotte Bennett. William died from diabetes 9 Nov. 1945 and is buried in the Seville City Cemetery.

Children of William Alonzo Nathaniel Jones and Effie Louella Whitmire:

(1) Eunice Lucille Jones born 23 April 1907, Silver City, Forsyth Co., Ga. died 2 August 1997, Decatur, Ga.
(2) Lealis Edward Jones born 29 April 1909, Silver City, Forsyth Co., Ga. died 6 June 1990, Decatur, Ga.
(3) Elwan Buel Jones born 18 Sept. 1912, Silver City, Ga. died 28 November 1996, Decatur, Ga.
(4) Roger Mayo Jones, Sr. born 12 August 1917, Silver City, Forsyth Co., Ga. died 17 Feburary 2009.

Lealis Edward Jones born 29 April 1909, Silver City, Forsyth Co., Ga. and died 6 June 1990 in Decatur, Georgia. He married Sara Mae Gardner 3 June 1938 in DeKalb County, Georgia, the daughter of Charles E. Gardner and Emma L. Hulme. She was born 17 May 1912 in DeKalb Co., Ga. and died 11 November 1993 in Lawrenceville, Ga. Both Lealis and Sara are burried in the Decatur Cemetery. They lived in Atlanta, Ga. until about 1946 when they moved to Decatur, Ga. with their two children.


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Lewis Jones - History

Bio: Lewis, Emanuel Jones (History - 1861)

Surnames: LEWIS BURGES MARKHAM

----Source: 1891 History of Clark and Jackson Co., Wisconsin, pg. 176-177

EMANUEL JONES LEWIS , a lumberman of Hemlock, was born in Uniontown, Alabama, May 10, 1861, the son of Rev. George (deceased) and Patsy (Burges) Lewis. The father was a native of Richmond, Virginia, and was for twenty years a minister of the gospel in the Methodist Episcopal Church in Alabama. The parents had ten children, viz: Henry, Lucy, Matthew, Samuel, Emanuel, Dovie, Manasses, Georgia, Fleming and Rebecca.


Emanuel J., the subject of this sketch, came to Lewis Valley, Wisconsin, near La Crosse, with a Mr. Bradbent, when in his sixth year. He soon afterward went to live with Colonel A. Wood, of that locality, and remained with him over twenty years, having been engaged in teaming mostly. He began working in the pineries eight years ago, and now takes contracts in taking logs to the river for other parties. Mr. Lewis was married May 8, 1889, to Julia Markham, who was born in Sauk County, Wisconsin, August 9, 1865, the daughter of Morris Markham, whose biography appears in this work. They have one child, Mollie Reed, born July 30, 1890. Both Mr. and Mrs. Lewis are members of the Presbyterian Church.

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Lewis Webster Jones

“The greatest challenge of this century,” Lewis Webster Jones told the New Jersey Press Association in 1955, “is to make the maximum use of the intelligence of Americans.” In his estimation, higher education was not meeting this demand. “If we do not meet it, we must abdicate world leadership and be succeeded by a society which does recognize the state’s interest in trained intelligence.” As the 15th president of Rutgers, Jones looked to the State of New Jersey to assist the university in fulfilling its commitment in training the future leaders of a democratic society. His seven years in office were devoted to redefining the relationship of Rutgers and the State and to expanding the university to meet the increase of students seeking higher education.

Lewis Webster Jones (1899–1975), of Emerson, Nebraska, was a noted economist and university president, a man of deep insight and broad educational philosophy. He spent his boyhood and youth near Portland, Oregon. A graduate of Reed College and the Brookings Graduate School of Economics and Government, where he received his Ph.D. in 1927, he had undertaken postdoctoral studies at Columbia University, the London School of Economics, Cambridge, and Geneva before serving as an economist and editor with the Foreign Policy Association until 1930. During his stay in Europe, he served as an economist on the staff of the League of Nations. For two years he was the economist for the Committee on the Costs of Medical Care and then joined the original faculty of Bennington College in 1932. In 1941 he was named president of Bennington, serving with distinction until 1947, at which time he became president of the University of Arkansas. During his presidency at Arkansas, Jones was a member of the President’s Commission on Higher Education. On September 7, 1951, he was selected as the 15th president of Rutgers.

Under Lewis Webster Jones, Rutgers began to fulfill its pledge to serve the state of New Jersey. Most significant was the reorganization of the university’s governing structure. In 1956 the Board of Governors was created to provide the State with a larger role in the control of the university. Recommended by a special committee of the Board of Trustees, the Board of Governors consisted of 11 voting members, six appointed by the governor and five from among the trustees, which continued to exist to serve in an advisory capacity, to manage certain funds, and to act as a “watchdog” over educational standards.

A noted economist, Lewis Webster Jones was devoted to redefining the relationship of Rutgers and the State of New Jersey and to expanding the university to meet the increase of students seeking higher education.

A major building program resulted in the construction of Alexander Library, the River dormitories along the Raritan (named after past presidents Frelinghuysen, Hardenbergh, and Campbell), the completion of Demarest Hall on the College Avenue Campus, Lipman Hall at the College of Agriculture, and Waksman Hall, which houses the Institute of Microbiology on the Busch Campus. Other construction projects under way or in the planning stages at the time of his departure in 1958 included new buildings for the study of horticulture and poultry on the G.H. Cook Campus, a library at Camden, and a health center and two new dormitories at the College for Women, renamed Douglass College in April 1955 in recognition of the vision and leadership of its first dean, Mabel Smith Douglass.

With expansion of facilities came an increased emphasis on graduate education. In 1954 Rutgers established two new divisions: the Graduate School of Social Work and the Graduate School of Library Service. Through the generous bequest of Florence Eagleton, the Eagleton Institute of Politics was established. By 1957 nearly 1,000 students were enrolled in graduate programs throughout the university. Educational programs and facilities were also expanded in Newark and Camden. A nursing curricula was introduced on the Newark campus in 1952 and evolved into the College of Nursing four years later. Scientific instruction and facilities received increased federal support after 1957 in the wake of the Soviet Union’s launching of Sputnik.

Lewis Webster Jones resigned as president of Rutgers in August 1958 to accept the presidency of the National Conference of Christians and Jews. In 1965 he retired to Sarasota, Florida, where he lived until his death on September 10, 1975.


Site of Lewis Jones’ birthplace, Caernarfon

Site of Lewis Jones&rsquo birthplace, Caernarfon

Not many people have lent their names to a town. One such person was Lewis Jones, the town being Trelew in Argentina. He was born in 1837 in a house near this spot. The house was on a tannery site, where his father worked as a skinner.

The family were members of Capel Engedi. Lewis was educated at the elementary school in the vestry under the chapel. About 1855 he became an apprentice in a print room.

He was a member of the Engedi Literary Society, known as Y Bwcis (meaning &ldquothe bookworms&rdquo). On Good Friday 1856, in a small room under Capel Engedi, the idea of a Welsh settlement free from the influence of the English language was discussed for the first time in Wales.

In 1857 Lewis bought his own printing press which he used in Caernarfon and soon after in Holyhead, where he settled after his marriage in 1859. The family moved in 1862 to Liverpool, where they joined people who were discussing establishing a Welsh colony in Patagonia, Argentina.

Before the end of 1862, Lewis sailed to South America to select a suitable location for the colony and receive the territorial government&rsquos support. The first group of Welsh settlers sailed from Liverpool in 1865 on the Mimosa.

From the start of the Welsh settlement in the Chubut Valley, Lewis was one of the most influential men. He was Provincial Governor for a time &ndash the only Welshman to hold the post. He spent time in government prison for issues such as resisting military service on the Sabbath and the continuation of Welsh-medium education.

The photo, courtesy of The National Library of Wales, shows Lewis in the centre, meeting indigenous chiefs in Patagonia in 1867.

He was the chief promoter of the Chubut Valley railway from Puerto Madryn, authorised by the government in 1884. The line opened in 1888 and the town that grew up around the terminus at Trelew was named in honor of Lewis Jones. Today Trelew is the valley&rsquos most populous town.

Lewis died in 1904, the year Trelew&rsquos first elected council was formed. He was buried in Moriah Chapel Cemetery, Trelew, near the river Chubut.


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