Austrian superstar Falco dies

Austrian superstar Falco dies


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

The bus accident that killed Johann Hölzel went largely unnoticed in the English-speaking world, but in the Strasses and Allees of his native Vienna, February 6, 1998, was something like the Day die Musik Died. Johann Hölzel, after all, was not the name by which most of the world knew him. To pop fans from Germany to Japan, he was Falco, the man behind “Rock Me Amadeus” and “Der Kommisar” and possibly the biggest star to emerge from Austria since Herr Mozart himself. Seventeen years after his first international breakthrough, Johann “Falco” Hölzel died on February 6, 1998, when his rental car was struck by a bus while he vacationed in the Dominican Republic.

The song that made Falco’s name internationally was “Der Kommissar,” a paranoid tale of youthful rebellion that was almost entirely inscrutable to non-speakers of German. “Alles klar, Herr Kommissar?” nevertheless entered the vocabularies of millions of New Wave fans around the world, sending the song to the top of many European pop charts in 1982 and making history by doing so. In the United States, where the original version of “Der Kommissar” barely dented the Hot 100, Falco would accomplish the same historic feat four years later, when “Rock Me Amadeus,” a German-language tribute to that other famous Austrian, shot all the way to #1 on the Billboard pop charts in the spring of 1986. And what exactly was Falco’s history-making achievement? Well, not only did “Rock Me Amadeus” make him the first Austrian to top the U.S. pop charts, but it also earned Falco the unlikely distinction of scoring the first American #1 pop hit by a male rap artist. Yes, that’s right—it wasn’t Doug E. Fresh or Kool Moe Dee or Kurtis Blow or Run-D.M.C. but an Austrian in a powdered wig who first brought hip hop—of a sort—to the top of the pops.

There were other hits for Falco in the years to come, but nothing approaching the international success of “Der Kommissar” and “Rock Me Amadeus.” He appeared repeatedly in the upper reaches of the German and Austrian charts in the late 80s and 1990s, but albums like 1988’s Wiener Blut (Viennese Blood) somehow failed to gain traction elsewhere. During his history-making career, however, Johann Hölzel sold an estimated 60 million records worldwide. He was only 40 years old when he died on this day in 1998.


Falco

Falco was the most internationally successful pop artist ever to come out of Austria, best known for his 1986 chart-topping hit "Rock Me Amadeus." Born Johann Holzel in Vienna on February 19, 1957, he was a classically trained child prodigy, but after graduating from the Vienna Conservatoire, he relocated to West Berlin and began fronting a jazz-rock band. Rechristening himself Falco in honor of the German skier Falko Weissflog, he returned to Vienna in time to play bass on the punk outfit Drahdiwaberl's 1979 album Psycho Today, penning their best-known song, "Ganz Wein." Falco began his solo career in 1982 with the LP Einzelhaft his "Der Kommissar," which fused techno-pop with rapped German lyrics, became a major European hit and a club favorite in the U.S., with a cover version by the group After the Fire reaching the Top Five in 1983. The follow-up, "Jeanny," was banned outright by radio as a result of its theme of prostitution, but nevertheless went on to top the German charts. While 1984's Junge Roemer attracted little attention, in 1986 Falco issued Falco 3, highlighted by the single "Rock Me Amadeus," a campy blend of classical music and synth pop which topped both the American and British charts. While the rock ballad "Vienna Calling" was a minor hit, Falco's subsequent efforts, including 1986's Emotional and 1988's Wiener Blut, fared poorly he had been long out of the spotlight when he died in a car accident on February 6, 1998 at the age of 40.


Contents

The song is about a relationship between a man and a woman named Jeanny.

At the time when it reached number one, critics said that the song glorifies rape. German TV and radio personality Thomas Gottschalk made various negative remarks and called the song "rubbish". An outcry in German language markets caused the song to be banned by some radio broadcasters or played with a preceding warning by others.

Falco argued that it is about the musings of a stalker.

The part of the "news flash" in the track is spoken by German newsreader Wilhelm Wieben.

Several feminist associations called for a boycott of the song. Some TV and radio stations in West Germany agreed and did not play the song "for ethical reasons", while others just played it on their charts shows. In East Germany, the song was not on air and playing it in dance clubs was prohibited.

There were also demands to prohibit the song in West Germany, but officials denied the application in April 1986. This angered news presenter Dieter Kronzucker, who presented the daily news magazine heute-journal for the West German public TV station ZDF. Following this, further radio stations followed the boycott. In the German federal state of Hesse, the song was aired accompanied by a warning. In the popular music show Formel Eins [de] cutscenes were aired, but only whilst the song was at the top of the charts.

Weekly charts Edit

Chart performance for Jeanny, Part I
Chart (1986) Peak
position
Austria (Ö3 Austria Top 40) [3] 1
Belgium (BRT Top 30 Flanders) [4] 2
Belgium (Ultratop 50 Flanders) [5] 2
Japan (Oricon Top 200) [6] 5
Netherlands (Dutch Top 40) [7] 1
Netherlands (Single Top 100) [8] 1
Norway (VG-lista) [9] 1
Sweden (Sverigetopplistan) [10] 7
Switzerland (Schweizer Hitparade) [11] 1
Country Peak
position
Germany 1
United Kingdom 68

* Sales figures based on certification alone.
^ Shipments figures based on certification alone.

In 1986, Falco released the single "Coming Home (Jeanny Part II, One Year Later)" on his album Emotional. [16] The song was also released as a single and reached the top of the charts in several countries, including Germany and Sweden. In Austria, the song reached 4th place in the charts. On the B-side of the single is the song "Crime Time" [ citation needed ] which is also from the album Emotional. [16]

Chart performance Edit

"The Spirit Never Dies (Jeanny Final)"
Single by Falco
from the album The Spirit Never Dies
ReleasedDecember 4, 2009
Recorded1987
GenrePop
LabelStarwatch (Warner Music)
Songwriter(s) Gunther Mende, Alexander C. Derouge
Producer(s) Gunther Mende

Although marketed as the third part of the Jeanny Trilogy there is no evidence that this song was ever to be planned as the final part. It was originally recorded in 1988 for the Wiener Blut album. There is no hint in the lyrics that this song ever had anything to do with the Jeanny saga. [ citation needed ]

The album The Spirit Never Dies was released posthumously in 2009 as a compilation of unpublished Falco songs. The title track, "The Spirit Never Dies (Jeanny Final)", was also released as a single and it scored in the top ten in Austria. The track was found by chance after a water-pipe burst in the archives of the recording studio Mörfelden-Walldorf that was used by Falco's producer Gunther Mende in 1987. After the closing of the archives, the tapes were sent to Mende personally, who then had a look at the material, all of which had originally been rejected by Falco's recording label Teldec this was explained by Horst Bork in an interview mentioning that Falco had tried to use a different style of music at the time that the label did not want to support. [17] After digital remastering of the tape, and inclusion of New Zealand vocalist Rietta Austin, the song was edited and published under the claim that it was the official third part of the Jeanny Trilogy by the album's producers Gunther Mende and Alexander C. De Rouge.[2][3][1][4]

The video for the song is an assembly of cut scenes from earlier Falco music videos along with photos and video clips of Falco's girlfriend Caroline Perron. [ citation needed ]

Chart performance Edit

Although the Jeanny theme was planned as a trilogy, only "Jeanny" (Part 1) and "Coming Home" (Part 2) were officially included in the series by Falco. "The Spirit Never Dies (Jeanny Final)" is considered a spurious third installment in the trilogy, which Falco died before completing according to his own plans.

In 1990, the album Data de Groove was published and it contains the song "Bar Minor 7/11 (Jeanny Dry)". The song uses the setting of a bar with Falco talking to a female bartender but one can only hear Falco's verses not the response from the bartender. A background singer repeats "Give it up!" and the song ends with the text "Tell me, who told you your name was Jeanny? . That, well, that must have been the boss of my record company then." Except for chart positions in Austria, the album was unsuccessful and the Jeanny-themed song was not noticed widely.

After Falco's death, an Internet company offered a song named "Where Are You Now? (Jeanny Part III)" for download in 2000. [ citation needed ] The company officials said that the tape with the song was sent to them anonymously because it was unauthorized the webpage providing the ability to download the song was taken offline shortly later. [ citation needed ] The music is taken from a period in 1988 when Falco had returned to work with Bolland & Bolland. Soon the theory sprang up that the song was actually a demo tape mixed by Bolland from other studio material in which Falco sung lyrics that had been proposed by Bolland to Falco, but the production of a studio version of the song was abandoned and it was not included on the Falco album for which it had been planned. This explanation was first offered by Falco's fellow musicians Richard Pettauer and Thomas Rabitsch and it was later confirmed by Bolland & Bolland in a television show on 5 February 2007. [ citation needed ]

Given the three possible successors to Part 1 and Part 2, the timeline can be given in different dimensions: [ citation needed ]

  • Enumeration by recording year
    • 1. "Jeanny" (1985) 2. "Coming Home" (1986) 3. "Where Are You Now" (1985/1986) 4. "The Spirit Never Dies" (1987) 5. "Bar Minor 7/11" (1990)
    • 1. "Jeanny" (1985) 2. "Coming Home" (1986) 3. "The Spirit Never Dies" (1987+2009) 4. "Where Are You Now" (1988) 5. "Bar Minor 7/11" (1990)
    • 1. "Jeanny" (1985) 2. "Coming Home" (1986) 3. "Bar Minor 7/11" (1990) 4. "Where Are You Now" (2000+2007) 5. "The Spirit Never Dies" (2009)

    Depending on the enumeration each version may be pointed out as the third part in the series of a total of five different songs related to the "Jeanny trilogy". [ citation needed ]


    Contents

    Falco was born Johann Hölzel on 19 February 1957 to Alois Hölzel and Maria Hölzel in a working class district of Vienna. Maria would later recall that she had been pregnant with triplets. As it was a dizygotic pregnancy, she miscarried the identical twins during the third month and Falco, who was conceived via a separate ovum, survived. Falco mused that "three souls in one breast sounds a little over-dramatic, but I do sense them sometimes. In my moodiness. I'll be really up and then right after I'll be really down." [2] [3]

    In 1963, Falco began his schooling at a Roman Catholic private school four years later, at age ten, he switched to the Rainergymnasium in Margareten. [ citation needed ] Falco's father left the family while he was still a child, and he was raised by his mother. [2]

    Falco began to show signs of unusual musical talent very early. As a toddler, he was able to keep time with the drumbeat in songs he heard on the radio. He was given a child's grand piano for his fourth birthday a year later, his birthday gift was a record player which he used to play music by Elvis Presley, Cliff Richard, and the Beatles. [ citation needed ]

    Falco wanted to be a pop star from a very early age. [2] At age 16, he attended the Vienna Conservatoire, but he became frustrated and soon left. [4] His mother insisted he begin an apprenticeship with the Austrian employee pension insurance institute. This too only lasted a short time. At seventeen, he got conscripted for eight months of military service with the Austrian army. [ citation needed ]

    In late 1970s Vienna, he became part of the Viennese nightlife, which included not just music but also striptease, performance art and a general atmosphere of satirizing politics and celebrating chaos. He played bass guitar in a number of bands under various pseudonyms, including "John Hudson" and "John DiFalco." One such band with whom he appeared was Drahdiwaberl, an Austrian group that employed shock tactics and stage antics. It was around this time he began performing under the stage name of Falco. Despite being closely tied with the Viennese underground club scene, Falco looked uncharacteristically clean-cut. In contrast to shabbier fashions, he had short hair (due to his military service) and wore Ray-Ban sunglasses and suits. His distinct style, coupled with his singing performance of the song "Ganz Wien" ("All of Vienna") led to manager Markus Spiegel offering to sign Falco in 1981. Ironically, it was at a concert for drug prevention and "Ganz Wien" has a line proclaiming "All Vienna is on heroin today." [2] [4]

    Once Falco was signed as a solo artist, he continued composing his own music and hired songwriter Robert Ponger. In 1981 Falco brought his intended first single "Helden von heute" to manager Horst Bork, but received a lukewarm reception. Bork felt that the B-side "Der Kommissar" was much stronger. Falco was hesitant, since the track is a German-language song about drug consumption that combines rap verses with a sung chorus. Though beginning to break through in America, rap was still quite rare in Western Europe at the time. Bork insisted and the song became a number-one success in Germany, France, Italy, Spain and Japan, while charting high in several other nations. [2]

    Though "Der Kommissar" failed to break through in the UK and US, the British rock band After the Fire covered the song with new English lyrics. This version charted at number five on the Billboard Hot 100 in the U.S. [2] That same year, American singer Laura Branigan recorded a non-single version of the song with new English lyrics under the title "Deep in the Dark" on her album Branigan 2. Einzelhaft, the album on which "Der Kommissar" appears, also topped the charts in Austria and the Netherlands.

    Falco and Ponger returned to the studio in 1983 to record Falco's second album Junge Roemer ("Young Romans"). It was a difficult project, as the two artists felt immense pressure to match their previous success and the recording process was plagued by delays. Junge Roemer was released in 1984. Even though the music video for the single "Hoch wie nie" ("Higher Than Ever") was aired on prime time TV in Austria, it failed to ignite interest internationally. [2] [5]

    Junge Roemer only charted in Austria where it went to number one. Outside of Austria and Spain, the title track and main single "Junge Roemer" failed to repeat the success of "Der Kommissar". As a reaction, Falco began to experiment with English lyrics in an effort to broaden his appeal. [ citation needed ] He parted ways with Ponger and chose a new production team: the brothers Rob and Ferdi Bolland from the Netherlands. [2]

    Falco recorded "Rock Me Amadeus" inspired in part by the Oscar-winning film Amadeus, and the song became a worldwide hit in 1986. It reached No. 1 in over a dozen countries, including the US, UK, and Japan, bringing the success that had eluded him in markets a few years earlier. The song remained in the top spot of the Billboard Hot 100 for three weeks. His album Falco 3 peaked at the number three position on the Billboard album charts. Unusually for a white act, especially one from mainland Europe, "Rock Me Amadeus" reached number six in the Billboard Top R&B Singles Chart, and Falco 3 peaked at number 18 on the Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums charts. Follow-up single "Vienna Calling" was another international pop hit, peaking at No. 18 of the Billboard Charts and No. 17 on the US Cash Box Charts in 1986. A double A-side 12" single featuring remixes of those two hits peaked at No. 4 on the US Dance/Disco charts. [ citation needed ]

    "Jeanny", the third release from the album Falco 3, brought the performer back to the top of the charts across Europe. Highly controversial when it was released in Germany and the Netherlands, the story of "Jeanny" was told from the point of view of a possible rapist and murderer. Several DJs and radio stations refused to play the ballad, which was ignored in the US, though it became a huge hit in many European countries, and inspired a sequel on his next album. [ citation needed ]

    After the success of "Rock Me Amadeus," there were talks of crossing over more permanently into the U.S. by working with American producers and collaborating with other American artists. These possibilities fell through, in part, due to Falco's personal problems. At this point in his career, he was dangerously addicted to alcohol and other drugs. [2]

    In 1986, the album Emotional was released, produced by Rob and Ferdi Bolland (Bolland & Bolland). Songs on the album included "Coming Home (Jeanny Part II, One Year Later)", "The Kiss of Kathleen Turner", and "Kamikaze Capa" which was written as a tribute to the late photojournalist Robert Capa. "The Sound of Musik" was another international success, and a Top 20 US dance hit, though it failed to make the US pop charts. [ citation needed ]

    In 1987, Falco went on the Emotional world tour ending in Japan. In the same year he sang a duet with Brigitte Nielsen, "Body Next to Body" the single was a Top 10 hit in German-speaking countries. The album Wiener Blut ("Viennese Blood") was released in 1988 but it did not get much publicity outside Germany and Austria. [ citation needed ]

    After 1986, there were a number of European hits, but Falco was rarely heard in the US and the UK. His 1992 comeback attempt, the album Nachtflug ("Night Flight") including the song "Titanic", was successful in Austria only. [6]

    Starting in the early 1990s, Falco lived in the Dominican Republic, where he worked on his last album from 1995 to 1998. Out of the Dark (Into the Light) was released posthumously on 27 February 1998 in Europe and worldwide in March. It charted at number one in Austria for 21 weeks. [2] [7] [8]

    Falco has been described by those who knew him as having a complex personality. He has been called ambitious, eccentric, caring, egotistical and deeply insecure. Thomas Rabitsch, a keyboardist who met Falco when the aspiring pop star was only 17 years old, said he was a quiet young man and precise bass player, but also arrogant and with a "very high opinion of himself." Markus Spiegel, the manager who discovered Falco, admitted that the pop star was "an extremely difficult artist" and known womanizer. Peter Vieweger, a guitarist who knew Falco before his success and continued to play in Falco's touring band and on his albums, remembers Falco as being "scared he would fail or be unmasked and not be as good as people thought he was." [2] [9]

    Through the 1980s and into the '90s, he became dependent on alcohol and cocaine. When under the influence he was unreliable at best and abusive at worst. Ferdi Bolland recalls that Falco was often so severely intoxicated that the writing process revolved around his "inability to be coherent, to even stand for a long time." Despite pleas from his manager and collaborators to get help, Falco stubbornly refused. [2] [9]

    While Falco was in a relationship with Isabella Vitkovic, she gave birth to a baby girl, Katharina, in 1986. The couple married in 1988, but it was a "love-hate" relationship, as Katharina describes it, and the marriage was short-lived. He believed that Katharina was his own daughter until a paternity test proved otherwise when she was seven years old. After this, Katharina's relationship with him became strained. Though they kept in contact, she took her mother's surname and claimed that she was written out of his will. She was 12 years old when he died. She did not reconcile with Falco's mother, Maria Hölzel, until a few years before Hölzel's death at the age of 87 in April 2014. Katharina subsequently published a memoir in 2008 called Falco war mein Vater (Falco Was My Father). [2] [3] [10] [11]

    Falco died of severe injuries received on 6 February 1998, 13 days before his 41st birthday, when his Mitsubishi Pajero collided with a bus on the road linking the towns of Villa Montellano and Puerto Plata in the Dominican Republic. [12] At the time of his death he was planning a comeback, which was successful with the posthumously released album Out of the Dark (Into the Light). His body was returned to Austria and buried at the Vienna Central Cemetery. [13]

    In 1998, Rob and Ferdi Bolland (Dutch producers and co-writers of about half of Falco's albums) released the EP Tribute to Falco under the name The Bolland Project feat. Alida. The title track featured samples of Falco's music the other tracks were "We Say Goodbye" and "So Lonely".

    The film Falco: Damn It, We're Still Alive! was released in Austria on 7 February 2008, ten years and one day after Falco's death. This title also lends its name to a posthumously-released album by Falco, Verdammt wir leben noch, which translates to "Damn, we're still alive!" Written and directed by Thomas Roth, the movie features musician Manuel Rubey as adult Falco. [14] The end credits include the line "With love, Ferdi & Rob", his frequent collaborators the Bollands.

    Falco's friend Niki Lauda named one of the Boeing airplanes in his Lauda Air fleet "Falco" after the singer. [15]

    Although "Der Kommissar" saw nearly contemporaneous and fairly straightforward mainstream covers including the loose translation by After The Fire and the reinterpretation by Suzy Andrews, both in 1982/1983, Falco's song "Rock Me Amadeus" has seen more frequent use. The track has been sampled by groups including the Bloodhound Gang, who also refer to Falco in their 1999 song "Mope", and by German rapper Fler in "NDW 2005" from Neue Deutsche Welle.

    The restaurant Marchfelderhof in a Vienna suburb maintains a permanent reserved table for Falco. [16]


    1. Return to Forever - 2:08
    2. Nuevo Afrikano - 4:57 - 5:54 - 5:31 - 4:56
    3. Qué Pasa Hombre (original version) - 4:41
    4. Poison (original version) - 4:58
    5. Sweet Symphony - 4:25
    6. Kissing in the Kremlin - 3:53
    7. Dada Love - 4:28 The Special Mix - 5:01
    8. Forever - 2:18

    The album was released posthumously in 2009 as a compilation of unpublished Falco songs. The title track, "The Spirit Never Dies (Jeanny Final)", was also released as a single and it scored in the top ten in Austria. The track was found by chance after a water-pipe burst in the archives of the recording studio Mörfelden-Walldorf that was used by Falco's producer Gunther Mende in 1987. After the closing of the archives, the tapes were sent to Mende personally, who then had a look at the material, all of which had originally been rejected by Falco's recording label Teldec this was explained by Horst Bork in an interview mentioning that Falco had tried to use a different style of music at the time that the label did not want to support. [1]

    After digital remastering of the tape, and inclusion of New Zealand vocalist Rietta Austin, the song was edited and published under the claim that it was the official third part of the Jeanny Trilogy by the album's producers Gunther Mende and Alexander C. De Rouge. [2] [3] [1] [4]

    The album was a hit in the Austrian and German music charts. [5] [6] [7]

    1. ^ abSueddeutsche.de
    2. ^New Album - Chaos Days with Falco
    3. ^Bild.de
    4. ^ Horst Bork, Falco. The Truth, Berlin 2009, ISBN978-3-89602-921-8, S. 187 ff., P 191
    5. ^Austriancharts.at
    6. ^germancharts.com
    7. ^Falco-alive.chArchived 2008-06-25 at the Wayback Machine

    This 2009 rock album–related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.


    The Truth about Falco’s Jeanny

    Jeanny is a song by the Austrian musician Falco, recorded in 1985 and to this very day is viewed as very controversial due to its lyrics.

    The song is essentially about a relationship between a man and a girl named Jeanny. At the time when it reached number one, critics said that the song glorifies rape. German TV and radio personality Thomas Gottschalk actually made various negative remarks and called the song “rubbish”. An outcry in German language markets caused the song to be banned by some radio broadcasters or played with a preceding warning by others. Typically, the scandal only helped to increase the sales of the single.

    The song is sung in a slightly unhinged voice, but the lyrics don’t actually contain any direct reference to the act of rape or abduction. It is left to the listener’s imagination.

    Falco argued that he was indeed inspired by the serious of abduction of young women that was going on at that time in Vienna and that he pretty much was going to explore this difficult thematic, addressing the perpetrator in a slightly standoffish-way, like ‘I know how you think.’ So, it is also essentially about the musings of a stalker. The man that was believed to cause the crimes during the time before and after the song was released in Vienna, was never caught. The five young women until this very day, were never found.

    And now, here’s a translation for you guys in English! We tried to translate it as closely to the original meaning of the song as possible ):

    NOTE: Lines in italics were in English in the original German version.

    Jeanny, Jeanny…

    [spoken] Newsflash, newsflash…

    “Official government reports…” (all in English)

    Jeanny, Jeanny…

    Jeanny, come, come on
    Stand up please
    You’re getting all wet
    It’s getting late, come
    We must leave here
    Out of the woods
    Don’t you understand?

    Where is your shoe?
    You lost it
    When I had to show you the way
    Which of us lost?
    You, yourself?
    I, myself?
    Or… we ourselves?

    Jeanny, quit livin’ on dreams
    Jeanny, life is not what it seems
    Such a lonely little girl in a cold, cold world
    There’s someone who needs you
    Jeanny quit livin’ on dreams
    Jeanny, life is not what it seems
    You’re lost in the night
    Don’t wanna struggle and fight
    There’s someone who needs you

    It’s cold
    We must leave here
    Come
    Your lipstick is smeared
    You bought it and
    And I saw it
    Too much red on your lips
    And you said, “Leave me alone”
    But I saw right through you
    Eyes say more than words
    You need me, don’t you, hmmmh?
    Everyone knows, that we’re together
    From today,
    Now I can hear them, they are coming!

    They’re coming!
    They are coming to get you.
    They won’t find you.
    Nobody will find you!
    You’re with me.

    Jeanny quit livin’ on dreams…

    [spoken] Newsflash:
    In the last months the number of missing persons has dramatically increased. The latest account from the local police reports another tragic case. It is a matter of a nineteen year old girl who was last seen two weeks ago. The police have not excluded the possiblity that a crime has been committed.

    Jeanny…

    Jeanny, quit livin’ on dreams…


    Contents

    Originally recorded in German, the song is about Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, his popularity and his debts. A longer version (eight minutes), named the "Salieri Mix", appeared on the initial US release of the album Falco 3. The song was inspired by the movie Amadeus. For the US release, the song was remixed with an English background overlay. There was never a full English version. [2]

    1756: Salzburg, January 27th, Wolfgang Amadeus is born. 1761: At the age of five Amadeus begins composing. 1773: He writes his first piano concerto. 1782: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart marries Constanze Weber. 1784: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart becomes a Freemason. 1791: Mozart composes The Magic Flute. On December 5th of that same year, Mozart dies. (Requiem) 1985: Austrian rock singer Falco records. "Rock Me Amadeus"!

    The song was released in Europe in 1985 in its original, German-language version. For the international markets (United States, UK, Japan etc.), several different single and extended mixes were produced by Rob Bolland none of them were solely an English-language version, but the international single versions reduced the German lyrics. However, the video, which featured the original European version, was used worldwide.

    1. Original Version (a.k.a. The Gold Mix) (3:21)
    2. Extended Version (7:07)
    3. Salieri Version (8:21) (on the international versions of Falco 3 this mix is denoted wrongly as "Solieri Version")
    4. Short Salieri Version (4:50)
    5. Special Salieri Version (3:59)
    6. American Edit (3:10)
    7. Canadian Edit (4:02)
    8. Canadian/American Edit (3:59)
    9. Extended American Edit (5:50)
    10. Club Mix 1991 (6:47)
    11. Radio Remix 1991 (4:30)
    12. Instrumental Remix 1991 (1:29)
    13. Live Version 1985 (from the album Opus & Friends) (4:20)
    14. Live Version 1986 (from the album Live Forever) (6:04)
    15. Symphonic Remix 2008 (from the album Symphonic) (4:52)
    16. Live Symphonic Version 1994 (from the DVD Symphonic) (4:12)
    17. Falco Biography Mix 2010 (from the 25th Anniversary Edition of Falco 3) (download only) (8:48)
    18. Ogris Debris Wiener Mischung 2017 (from the Falco remix series JNG RMR) (4:50)
    19. Motsa's Dub Revibe 2017 (from the Falco remix series JNG RMR) (3:10)

    The song's music video mixes elements of Mozart's time with 1980s contemporary society. Falco is shown in a 20th-century-style dinner jacket, walking past people in eighteenth-century formal wear. Later, he is shown dressed as Mozart, with wild colored hair, being held on the shoulders of men dressed in modern motorcycle-riding attire. At the end, the two crowds mix.

    The video for the 1991 remix is a much more sexualized version, starting with the refrain 'sugar sweet', with extra footage spliced throughout, including a similar black carriage riding at night with the driver covered in lights, escorted by police motorcycles, scantily clad girls in black leather riding outside it, and bright neon fashions inside, resembling earlier-century formal wear. A different crowd in a more Mozart-era formal attire was excessively fraternizing at a party. This version also contains red line art of Falco, guitar riff clips, and a long car scene driving away at the end, to a saxophone solo over the added refrain.

    With "Rock Me Amadeus", Falco became the first German-speaking artist to be credited with a number-one single in all mainstream US pop singles charts: the Billboard Hot 100 and Cash Box Top 100 Singles. Prior to Falco, "99 Luftballons" by Nena got to number one on Cash Box, but peaked at number two on the Billboard Hot 100. The single hit number one on the Billboard Hot 100 on 29 March 1986. [3]

    In the United Kingdom, where his "Der Kommissar" failed to make the charts, the song hit number one on 10 May 1986, becoming the first single by an Austrian act to achieve this distinction. "Vienna Calling" hit number 10 and three subsequent singles briefly charted.

    In Canada, the song reached number one on 1 February 1986. (There, "Der Kommissar" had reached number 11 in January 1983, and "Vienna Calling" would hit number 8 in April 1986.)

    "Rock Me Amadeus" would later be ranked number 87 in VH1's 100 Greatest Songs of the 80s and number 44 in VH1's 100 Greatest One-Hit Wonders.

    Weekly charts Edit

    Original version
    Chart (1985–1986) Peak
    position
    Australia (Kent Music Report) [4] 15
    Austria (Ö3 Austria Top 40) [5] 1
    Belgium (Ultratop 50 Flanders) [6] 2
    Canada (The Record) [7] 2
    Canada Top Singles (RPM) [8] 1
    France (IFOP) [9] 79
    Germany (Official German Charts) [10] 1
    Ireland (IRMA) [11] 1
    Netherlands (Single Top 100) [12] 46
    New Zealand (Recorded Music NZ) [13] 1
    Norway (VG-lista) [14] 6
    Poland (LP3) [15] 24
    South Africa (Springbok Radio) [16] 1
    Spain (AFYVE) [17] 1
    Sweden (Sverigetopplistan) [18] 1
    Switzerland (Schweizer Hitparade) [19] 2
    UK Singles (OCC) [20] 1
    US Billboard Hot 100 [21] 1
    US Billboard Hot Dance Club Play [21] 4
    US Billboard Hot Black Singles [21] 6
    US Cash Box [22] 1
    Canadian/American '86 mix
    Chart (1986) Peak
    position
    Netherlands (Dutch Top 40) [23] 3
    Netherlands (Single Top 100) [24] 2
    Sun Diego Remix
    Chart (2018) Peak
    position
    Austria (Ö3 Austria Top 40) [25] 71
    Germany (Official German Charts) [26] 63

    Year-end charts Edit

    Original version Edit

    Chart (1985) Position
    Austria (Ö3 Austria Top 40) [27] 5
    Switzerland (Schweizer Hitparade) [28] 5
    Chart (1986) Position
    Australia (Kent Music Report) [29] 69
    Belgium (Ultratop 50 Flanders) [30] 26
    Canada Top Singles (RPM) [31] 22
    South Africa (Springbok Radio) [32] 3
    US Billboard Hot 100 [33] 28
    US Cash Box [34] 19

    Canadian/American '86 mix Edit

    All-time charts Edit

    * Sales figures based on certification alone.
    ^ Shipments figures based on certification alone.


    You may also want to watch:

    In a eulogy Helmut Zilk, a former mayor of Vienna, dubbed him “a musical genius, even when most people didn’t recognise it”. If Falco really was a genius it’s fair to say that in the last years of his life he became better known for his chaotic lifestyle than his music. His transition from jobbing Viennese musician to international superstar didn’t quite happen overnight but his rise was sufficiently meteoric to undermine a personality already battling with insecurity and low self-esteem.

    “The alcohol problems, the cocaine, it all started with success,” he reflected. “When success grows faster than the soul can grow with it, well, then you have problems.”


    On our first trip to Munich, Germany, my husband and I were lucky enough to take a day trip with some friends that included a stop at Schloss Hellbrunn.

    The plan was to go to Salzburg, Austria and see the sights. Unfortunately, it was a bit overcast and a bit rainy but we were up for whatever our friends thought was worth seeing. During the car ride, they kept telling us, with a chuckle, we were going to visit a very “interesting” castle. It’s very “funny,” they said. Uh, OK. What weren’t they telling us? The castle in question was Schloss Hellbrunn. And, boy, was it “interesting.”


    Falco

    Johann (Hans) Hölzel (19 February 1957 – 6 February 1998), better known by his stage name Falco, was an Austrian rap, pop and rock musician and had four #1 Hits - "Der Kommissar", "Rock Me Amadeus", "Jeanny" and "Coming Home (Jeanny Part 2, Ein Jahr danach)".

    He is the only artist to score a #1 Hit in the U.S. with a German language song, and his albums and singles have sold about 60 million copies worldwide.

    Early Years

    Born in Vienna, studying at the Vienna Music Conservatory in 1977 which he left after one semester to pursue a career in music, he lived for a short time in West Berlin while singing in a jazz-rock band. When he returned to Vienna he was calling himself "Falco," reportedly in tribute to the East German ski jumper Falko Weißpflog, and playing in the Austrian bands Spinning Wheel and Hallucination Company. En route to becoming an international rock star in his own right, he was bass player in the Austrian hard rock-punk rock band Drahdiwaberl (from 1978 until 1983). With Drahdiwaberl he wrote and performed the song "Ganz Wien" which he would also include on his debut solo album Einzelhaft.

    Individual success

    Falco's first hit was "Der Kommissar" from the 1982 album Einzelhaft. A German language song about drug consumption that combines rap verses with a sung chorus, Falco's record was a number-one success in many countries but failed to break big in the U.S. The song, however, would prove to have a life of its own in two English-language versions. British Rock band After the Fire recorded an English cover version, loosely based on Falco's lyrics and also called "Der Kommissar" (with "uh-oh" and "alles klar Herr Kommissar" the only other lyrics held over from the original). This time, the song shot to number three in the United States (their only major hit there) in 1983, though it failed to crack the UK Top 40. The band - who had been together more than a decade - broke up almost immediately thereafter. That same year, American singer Laura Branigan recorded a version of the song with new English lyrics, under the title "Deep in the Dark" on her album Branigan 2.

    After a second album, Junge Roemer, failed to provide a repeat to his debut single's success (outside of Austria and Germany, where the album topped the charts), Falco began to experiment with English lyrics in an effort to broaden his appeal, and chose a new production team. The result would be the most popular album and single of his career.

    Falco recorded "Rock Me Amadeus" inspired in part by the Oscar-winning film Amadeus, and the song became a worldwide hit in 1986. This time, his record reached #1 in the U.S. and UK, bringing him the success that had eluded him in that major market a few years earlier. The song remained in the top spot of the Billboard Hot 100 for three weeks and his album, Falco 3, fittingly peaked at the number three position on the Billboard album charts. Unheard of at the time for a white performer, much less a European one, the Austrian rapper's single climbed to the upper reaches of the Billboard Top R&B Singles Chart (only a few years earlier called the "Black Singles" chart), peaking at number 6. Falco 3 peaked at number 18 on the Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums charts. Ultimately, "Rock Me Amadeus" went to the #1 spot in over a dozen countries including the Soviet Union and Japan. Follow-up single "Vienna Calling" was another international pop hit, peaking at #18 of the Billboard Charts and #17 on the U.S. Cash Box Charts in 1986. A double A-side 12" single featuring remixes of those two hits peaked at #4 on the U.S. Dance/Disco charts.

    "Jeanny" the third release from the album Falco 3, brought the performer back to the top of the charts across Europe. Highly controversial when it was released in Germany and the Netherlands, the story of "Jeanny" was told from the point of view of a rapist and possible murderer. Several DJs and radio stations refused to play the ballad, which was ignored in the U.S., although it became a huge hit in many European countries, and inspired two sequels on later albums.

    In 1986, the album Emotional was released, produced by Rob and Ferdi Bolland (Bolland & Bolland). On the Album were "Coming Home (Jeanny Part 2, Ein Jahr danach)" and the song "Kamikaze Cappa" which was written as a tribute to the late photojournalist Robert Capa. "The Sound of Musik" was another international success, and a Top 20 U.S. Dance hit, though he failed to make the U.S. pop charts. He also went on "Emotional-Tour" which was a world tour where he ended up in Japan at 1987. In 1987, he sang a duet with Brigitte Nielsen "Body Next to Body" and the single was a Top 10 hit in the Germanic countries. The Album Wiener Blut was released in 1988 but it did not get much publicity outside Germany and Austria.

    After "Jeanny," there were a number of European hits, but Falco was rarely heard in the U.S. and the UK. His 1992 U.S. comeback attempt, the album Nachtflug with the song "Titanic" won a number of awards, but failed to chart in America.

    Falco died of severe injuries received from a collision with a bus in his Mitsubishi Pajero near the city of Puerto Plata, in the Dominican Republic on 6 February 1998, just two weeks before his 41st birthday. While it was initially reported that the autopsy showed high blood levels of alcohol and cocaine, this was disputed. At the time of his death, he was working on a comeback into the music world.
    He was buried in the Zentralfriedhof (Central Cemetery) in Vienna, Austria.


    Famous birthdays Feb. 6 ‘Rock Me Amadeus’ singer dies

    A little-known Austrian artist died in a car crash on this day in 1998. Johann Holzel’s death didn’t make headlines in the United States, but in German-speaking countries, he was huge. He was here, too, briefly and years earlier, under the name Falco.

    That was courtesy of his catchy tune “Rock Me Amadeus.” Falco’s song extolling composer Mozart as a rebel of his time reached No. 1 here and worldwide in 1986. (Falco’s similarly interesting “Der Kommissar” failed to catch on quite the same way, in 1982.)

    And here’s the fun thing: The success of “Rock Me Amadeus” made Falco the first with a No. 1 hit by a rap artist. Says history.com: “Yes, that’s right — it wasn’t Doug E. Fresh or Kool Moe Dee or Kurtis Blow or Run-D.M.C. but an Austrian in a powdered wig who first brought hip-hop — of a sort — to the top of the pops.”

    Owatonna’s own, R&B singer Har Mar Superstar –— born Sean Tillmann —– is 38. The L.A. transplant also appeared in the movies ““Whip It”” and “”Starsky and Hutch”” (2004). Watch him in his full, funky form doing “”Lady You Shot Me” at his website, harmarsuperstar.com.

    (Courtesy of thesunsetstrip.com)

    Kardashian kasualty Kris Humphries is 31. The nice guy from Minnesota and power forward for the Washington Wizards was a standout at Hopkins High and the University of Minnesota.

    (Getty Images: Jeff Zelevansky)

    Actress Crystal Reed of MTV’s “Teen Wolf” is 31.

    (Getty Images: Frazer Harrison)

    Actor Dane DeHaan –— the Green Goblin in ““The Amazing Spider-Man” ” — is 30.

    (Getty Images: Larry Busacca)

    Actress Alice Greczyn of ABC Family’s “”The Lying Game”” is 30.

    Actress Alice Eve of “”Star Trek: Into Darkness”” is 34.

    (Getty Images: Monica Schipper)

    Singer Rick Astley is 50. He’s beloved for his 1987 song, “Never Gonna Give You Up.”

    (Getty Images: Scott Barbour)

    Vocalist Axl Rose of Guns ‘N’’ Roses is 54.

    (Getty Images: Evan Agostini)

    Country singer Richie McDonald of Lonestar is 54.

    (Getty Images: Dimitrios Kambouris)

    Actor Barry Miller —– ““Fame,”” “”Saturday Night Fever” ” — is 58.

    (Getty Images: Frazer Harrison)

    Actor-director Robert Townsend of ““The Parent ‘Hood”” is 59.

    (Getty Images: Ilya S. Savenok)

    Actress Kathy Najimy —– “The Big C,”” ““Sister Act”” –— is 59.

    (Getty Images: Astrid Stawiarz)

    Actor Jon Walmsley — Jason of “”The Waltons”” — is 60. He’s shown at a 2011 Waltons reunion.

    (Getty Images: Bennett Raglin)

    Irish-American director Jim Sheridan —– ““My Left Foot,”” ““In America,”” ““In the Name of the Father” ” — is 67.

    Actor Michael Tucker is 71.

    (Associated Press: Adam Rountree)

    Singer and 50s teen idol Fabian is 73. At right is his wife, Andrea, with him as he receives a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 2001.

    St. Paul-born actor Mike Farrell is 77. The former “M*A*S*H*” star was 2 when he moved with his family to Hollywood. We still claim him, of course.

    (Getty Images: Alberto E. Rodriguez)

    Ululations for newsman Tom Brokaw’s 76th birthday.

    Actress Mamie Van Doren is 85.

    (Getty Images: Marsaili McGrath)

    Actor Rip Torn — “Cross Creek,” “The Larry Sanders Show” — is 85.

    Hungarian-born socialite and actress Zsa Zsa Gabor is … still with us. The star of ““Moulin Rouge”” (1952) is 99.

    (Associated Press file photo)

    The late reggae legend Bob Marley was born on this day in 1945. The force who brought the world “Redemption Song,” “No Woman No Cry” and “One Love” died of cancer in 1981. He’s shown talking to reporters before a practice match with friends and musicians at a soccer field in Paris, France, on May 10, 1977.

    (Associated Press file photo)

    Unforgettable crooner Natalie Cole was born on this day in 1950. The daughter of legend Nat “King” Cole died of lung disease in December 2015.

    Baseball Hall of Famer George Herman “Babe” Ruth Jr. was born in Baltimore on this day in 1895. The Sultan of Swat, the Behemoth of Bust, the Great Bambino suffered from alcoholism and cancer and died in 1948.

    (Associated Press file photo)


    Watch the video: Falco Tourneestart in Österreich 1986


Comments:

  1. Nazshura

    Absolutely with you it agree. Idea good, it agree with you.

  2. Fassed

    What does this word mean?

  3. Mazuk

    Funny as hell. Or, I'm afraid, it’s not funny, but creepy.

  4. Ahebban

    Nonsense

  5. Cesare

    It's just another sentence

  6. Sadeek

    Work smartly, not until the night

  7. Devries

    Congratulations, you just visited brilliant idea



Write a message